Home Care worker shortage: patients forced to live in hospitals

Home Care worker shortage: patients forced to live in hospitals

Ontario has a shortage of personal support workers working in Home Care. Is it any wonder that this is the case? Low pay, no guaranteed of hours, health and safety concerns, unpaid travel time and expenses, poor or non-existent benefits, few or no sick days, these are the working conditions a PSW can expect if they become a home care worker. As a result of these poor working conditions and the need to find stable work at a livable wage, most personal support workers look to leave the home care sector for positions in long term care homes, retirement homes or hospitals where the pay and working conditions are significantly superior.
Home support care in New Brunswick: the Province must intervene

Home support care in New Brunswick: the Province must intervene

Click here to sign the pledge to make Community Care Services in NB public CUPE 4598, which represents 136 Canadian Red Cross Home support workers in New Brunswick, organized Tuesday’s press conference. The Union criticized the Employer’s inaction when it comes to negotiations. “On March 31, 2018, it will have been nine years since our collective agreement expired”, says Local 4598 President Thérèse Duguay. Despite the employees’ best efforts, the Red Cross still refuses to negotiate a new contract.
Home care services for 1500 inner city patients still in peril despite government's funding announcement

Home care services for 1500 inner city patients still in peril despite government's funding announcement

TORONTO, ON (July 19, 2016) – Home care services of more than 1500 infirm and elderly, inner city patients provided by Toronto’s Neighbourhood Group are still in peril of coming to an end despite today’s announcement of additional sector-wide funding by the provincial government. Personal Support Workers from Neighbourhood Group provide home care to low income or difficult to care for patients in central Toronto. These workers speak dozens of different languages that reflect Toronto’s diversity and are often the lifeline for many isolated clients.